Study: Troop Morale Up in Iraq, Down in Afghanistan

The army is about to release a report saying that U.S. troop morale improved in Iraq last year. But at the same time, soldiers fighting in Afghanistan suffered more depression as violence there worsen
Spc. Daniel Collier, medic, from Portland, Oregon, USA, of Charlie Company, 1st Platoon, 1-15 Infantry, 3rd Brigade Combat team, 3rd Infantry Division, guards a house during a routine meeting with local leaders at Salman Pak city about 30 miles (45 kilometers), south of Baghdad, Iraq, on Monday, March. 3, 2008. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)
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Washington (AP) The army is about to release a report saying that U.S. troop morale improved in Iraq last year. But at the same time, soldiers fighting in Afghanistan suffered more depression as violence there worsened.

Sources familiar with the annual battlefield study say it will show that soldiers on their third and fourth tours of duty have sharply greater rates of mental health problems than those on their first or second deployments.

Slightly more soldiers in Iraq reported their morale was high or very high than the year before although it was still only 20 percent.

This year's report was drawn from the work of a team of mental health experts who traveled to the war zones last fall. The experts surveyed more than 2,200 soldiers in Iraq and nearly 900 in Afghanistan. Based on the findings, the military says it might need to send more mental health workers to the war front.