Future of Wash., Colo. pot farming still uncertain

By: Associated Press Email
By: Associated Press Email

YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) -- Now that Washington voters have legalized marijuana, will the Yakima Valley add pot to the list of products produced in one of the world's most productive agricultural regions?

Not necessarily.

Too many unanswered questions remain, from how the state will regulate it to whether entrepreneurs or large corporations should lead the way.

And marijuana remains illegal under federal law. Many states have approved it for medical use, but only Washington and Colorado have legalized recreational use.

The Justice Department has not said whether it will try to block the new laws.

For that reason, key land-grant universities that typically aid the agriculture industry by researching such things as pest control and crop yields -- but rely on federal funding to do so -- are avoiding the pot industry.


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